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53 specimens listed
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Pyromorphite - important, historic
stock #1023-JM-553
Berezovsk Mine, Ekaterinburg, Sverdlovskaya Oblast, Middle Urals
Sverdlovsk Oblast, Russia
8.2 x 7.3 x 4.3 CM (cabinet)
price: $2200
Pre Tucson

From the Harvard Museum collection then by trade (1977) to John Marshall, this is a very old specimen originally in the Leibener collection. Exceptional size and quality for this famous Siberian Urals locality where mining began in 1747. Although this was a gold mining area there were many other minerals found there, it is the type locality for 7 species one of which (Crocoite) led to the discovery of the element Chromium. This is an extraordinary rich and significant Pyro specimen from this classic locality, it may be the best extant outside of a major museum. Typical specimens are usually just druzy crusts and association pieces. The Pyromorphite here is deep forest green with the main crystalized mass of 6x5 CM. Individual prisms are up to 6 mm in size though most are under 4mm. In remarkably good condition, no obvious naked eye visible damage but magnification does show several small broken and chipped crystals. Despite this it is still a good display quality specimen and would be a fine addition to any serious Pyromorphite suite or Russian collection.

Topaz - classic Russian, on Feldspar, Quartz
stock #ARET 16.1-597
Murzinka Mine,Sarapulka Dist., Sverdlovskaya Oblast, Middle Urals
Urals Region, Russia
5.4 x 3.2 x 3 CM (small cabinet/large miniature)
price: $560
Pre Tucson

A 2.5 CM tall gem clear colorless Topaz crystal rises above the contrasting Matrix. The Topaz is undamaged, in impeccable condition, the matrix has some bruising but it is the matrix and not at all a detriment. A very nice composition over all, good Topaz from the Urals is something of a mineralogical prize and highly respected by collectors. A very good value for the quality and esthetics.

Pyrrhotite - rare penetration twin
stock #14.1-100
Dalnegorsk, Kavalerovo Mining District
Primorsky Kray, Russia
4.1 x 2.9 x 2.8 CM x 2.9 (miniature)
price: $760
Pre Tucson

Textbook perfect, complete and sharp this is an unusual type of twin for Pyrrhotite. With small areas of Galena and Sphalerite, this is essentially all Pyrrhotite. In excellent condition as seen, no damage at all but the usual tension cracks are seen as is typical though there is no repair or instability. Great golden patina and displays well from most any angle, a choice Dalnegorsk piece and an excellent twin Pyrrohotite. Since Pyrrhotite is generally found in hexagonal crystals, the penetration twin has 4 terminations showing with six sides on each end, all at 90 degrees from each other. This is only the second such twin I have ever seen.

Pyrrhotite with Quartz and spinel-twinned Galena
stock #23.1-365
2nd Sovetskii Mine, Dalnegorsk, Primorsky Krai
Far Eastern Region, Russia
9 x 6.4 x 5.9 CM (cabinet)
price: $760
Spring 23

Golden metallic Pyrrhotite crystals in several habits contrast with silver Galena, white Quartz and black Sphalerite. In exceptional condition, there is no visible damage and this has several very different and esthetic display angles. These Pyrrhotites are unusually well-formed, highly reflective and sharp. From the 1980-85 era, these are fantastic for the specie, and much more defined than most of the more recent finds.

Lorenzenite with minor Aegerine
stock #23.1-348-(D5628)
Lovozero Massif
Murmansk Oblast, Russia
5.4 x 4.2 x 2.5 CM (cabinet)
price: $270
Spring 23

Choice crystals of Lorenzenite, a Sodium Titanium Silicate with distinct form up to 1.5 CM. From early finds at Lovozero (Kola Penninsula, Russia). This was in the collection of the Fersman Museum (Moscow) and later in the University of Delaware Museum. Older labels included giving the USSR as country of origin. The largest crystal is well-exposed, it has a nice red-purple color and textbook form. Minor crystals of Aegerine are also present, all in very fine condition.

Axinite - gemmy crystals
stock #10.1-298
Puiva Mount, Saranpaul, Khanty-Mansi Okrug, Tyumenskaya Oblast
Pre Polar Ural region, Russia
5.5 x 3. x 2.7 CM (cabinet)
price: $650
Spring 23

Very sharp, complete and glassy, this is a flawless Axinite with many transparent sections. From the now famed discoveries in the Polar Urals, this is far more striking in person. Very few localities in the world ever produced Axinites of this calibre, the edges on this are razor sharp, it could easily cut skin or be cut as faceted gems. Usually crystals of this size have jagged edges or tiny chips, this one does not. The main crystal is 5.5 CM across. Backlighting adds a fine glow as well, but these photos are not backlit, this gives a true presentation of the specimen in a "normal" display. These have become quite uncommon over the past two decades and are now usually quite expensive. A very good value for quality in this size.

Galena with Calcite, Quartz etc.
stock #10.1-297
Dalnegorsk, Kavalerovo Mining District
Primorsky Kray, Russia
8.1 x 4.6 x 3.1 CM (cabinet)
price: $450
Fall 22

Esthetic Galena crystal that is well-exposed, sits at the top of mixed specie matrix. The main Galena is complete, sharp with some face etching, and is a modified cubo-octahedral form. From the famed mines of Dalnegorsk, which has been the source of some of the world's best Galenas. Displays well from almost any angle, there is no damage seen, and the luster ranges from satin to mirror bright.

Quartz "interference" crystal
stock #22.1-137
Dalnegorsk, Kavalerovo Mining District
Primorsky Kray, Russia
9.3 x 2.7 x 2.6 CM (cabinet)
price: $440
Fall 22

A perfect example of so called interference Quartz. For any Quartz suite this is a fine, exotic and strange form. From Dalnegorsk a few years ago this came from a small find and this was one of the largest crystals and one of the very few that were complete and undamaged. It seems that in this location at least as the Quartz grew it had a series of thin Calcite blades on each side. The Calcite has since dissolved away but had an impact on the crystal development. The result is a remarkable stepped form in an inclined series of ridges. Unusual and certainly esthetic in a strange way!